Protecting
Our Waters

 

WE’RE IN THIS TOGETHER

The Mona Lake Watershed Council is dedicated to restoring, protecting, and maintaining the Mona Lake Watershed — now and for future generations. Join your neighbors to keep Mona Lake beautiful. Donate today.

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About the Mona Lake Watershed Council

ALUM TREATMENT

Plagued for decades with excessive algae blooms, Mona Lake should be noticeably clearer after chemical treatment was applied following 20 years of study.

WATER QUALITY MONITORING

We regularly monitor Mona Lake’s water quality by performing controlled tests. We monitor for clarity and any contaminates. 

CONTINUED STUDIES

We continuously perform various studies with groups like Michigan Tech University to evaluate and provide recommendations.

Together We Can Protect
the Waters We Love

Our mission is to restore, protect, and maintain the Mona Lake Watershed as a viable natural resource for future generations and to inspire greater awareness, behavior, and knowledge through the use of science and education.

About the Watershed

The Mona Lake Watershed spans over 45,500 acres and covers 2,400 acres of lake and pond area. The majority of the Watershed lies within Muskegon County, with the exception of a small section of the northeast corner located in Newaygo County. It contains almost 23 miles of natural streams and creeks, with almost 40 miles of maintained drains. In the watershed, 23,600 acres is undeveloped consisting of forest, open fields, wetland, water, or dunes (roughly 52% of the watershed), 7,500 acres are used for agricultural development, and 14,500 acres are used for residential, commercial, and industrial use.

View Alum Campaign

The future of our environment depends on what we do today to protect it.

Featured Campaign

Alum Treatment

Separate studies determined that the lake primarily in Norton Shores was plagued with high amounts of phosphorous that, when released from the mucky lake bottom, caused excessive toxic algae blooms that severely degraded water clarity.

The eastern portion of the lake was treated with alum – a chemical compound that binds with phosphorous and sinks it to the bottom, essentially capping it.

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A true conservationist is a man who knows that the world is not given by his fathers, but borrowed from his children.

- John James Audubon

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